we like the m00n


trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.

- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.

[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.

[source]



fat-birds:

Secretary Bird hunts for, then finds, then kills and eats a snake in Tanzania- in 1 minute.

I imagine that a student at Hogwarts who was petrified of snakes would have a secretary bird as a Patronus!


Via Mind Blowing Science!

slayboybunny:

HAVE YALL TAKEN THE TIME TO APPRECIATE THE AMAZING DUGONG, 
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THE ONLY OTHER NONEXTINCT ANIMAL IN THE SIRENIA AKA SEA COW FAMILY BESIDES MANATEE ?
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it is like a smaller smoother manatee…

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but with a DOLPHIN TAIL,
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and a SPACESHIP VACUUM MOUTH

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DUGONG!!
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Via Shychemist

afro-dominicano:

Giant Galaxy-Spying Telescope Set to Break Ground in Hawaii

A giant, 100-foot-diameter (30 meters) telescope has been green-lighted for construction on the island of Hawaii.

The Hawaii Board of Land and Natural Resources gave approval on July 25 for construction to begin on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), a massive observatory on the summit of Mauna Kea, said representatives for The TMT Observatory Corp., a collaboration of universities involved in the telescope’s development.

"TMT has worked for many years to design an unprecedented telescope, but also to work with the community to incorporate respect for Mauna Kea in our stewardship," Gary Sanders, project manager for TMT, said in a statement. "It is an honor and a privilege to now begin building our next-generation observatory in so special a place."

When it begins operations, TMT will enable astronomers to explore objects inside the solar system, stars throughout the Milky Way and neighboring galaxies, and forming galaxies at the farthest edge of the observable universe.

Since the site was chosen, the telescope’s construction has been controversial among native Hawaiians, for whom the volcano represents sacred ground.

Nevertheless, the first phase of construction is scheduled to begin later this year, on a mountain that’s host to other world-class observatories, including the twin 33-foot (10 m) Keck telescopes. The proposed telescope would be three times the size of each of the Keck telescopes.



squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!

https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner



spaceexp:

Waning Gibbous, 91% of the Moon is Illuminated taken on August 12, 2014 with a Canon SX50 HS IMG_1884

Source: Ted_Roger_Karson





child-of-thecosmos:

Fiery Looping Rain on the Sun [Full HQ video]

Eruptive events on the sun can be wildly different. Some come just with a solar flare, some with an additional ejection of solar material called a coronal mass ejection (CME), and some with complex moving structures in association with changes in magnetic field lines that loop up into the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced all three. A moderately powerful solar flare exploded on the sun’s lower right hand limb, sending out light and radiation. Next came a CME, which shot off to the right out into space. And then, the sun treated viewers to one of its dazzling magnetic displays — a phenomenon known as coronal rain.


Via sagan|sense


moments-in-spacetime:

futurist-foresight:

When do you think there will be a human presence on Mars? (Credit NASA / Via nasa.gov)

Not soon enough



photojojo:

While they all may look the same rolling towards the shore, photographer and Buddhist monk Syoin Kajii manages to capture the subtle differences between ocean waves. 

See the rest of his dramatic photographs from the series Nami below.

Buddhist Monk Captures Rolling Ocean Waves

via Feature Shoot


Via Rocket | Science

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